Frill Canary

 

Canaries

 

Dutch Frilled Canary

The Northern Dutch canary is a medium sized variety, just slightly smaller than the Border Canary. Though similar in appearance to the Parisian Frilled breed with the long swooping feather patterns, the frilled feathers on the Northern Dutch Canary are less dense, have smaller curls, and are more of a band just around the middle of the bird rather than all over.

     The Northern Dutch Canary is a "type canary", bred for physical appearance rather than color or song. It is very pretty, nicely proportioned, hardy and vigorous. Frilled canaries do however, tend to be a little more high strung and nervous than other canary breeds.

The Northern Dutch Frilled Canary is a medium sized, nicely appointed, attractive canary. They reach a length of about 6 1/2 to 6 3/4 inches (16.5 to 17 cm), just slightly smaller than the Border Canary.     

The primary feature of all frilled canaries are three distinct patterns of curled feathers. These consist of the mantle, the jabot, and the fins. The mantle feathers are on the back, they part down the center and curl symmetrically over the shoulders forming what looks like a cape. The jabot are wavy undulating feathers coming from each side of the breast, curling inward to form a ruffle that meets in the middle. The fins come from the thighs, long well-frilled feathers that rise upward around the wings. The main focus of the frills is on symmetry rather than volume. Though they should be full, they also need to be crisp and defined.      The frilling for the Northern Dutch is primarily around the middle of the canary and should be nicely balanced and symmetrical. The head, neck, belly and thighs are smooth with no frilling similar to regular canaries. They have a normal canary stance, but do not stand quite as erect as the Southern Dutch Frilled variety.      Coloration in frilled canaries is of little importance. They may be buff, green, clear, ticked, or variegated and occasionally a few dominant whites. Yellow is usually more rare except in the the case of the Gibber Italicus.

Parisian Frilled Canary

Frilled canaries have been around for a very long time. Though not much is known about the frilled mutation, it is generally agreed that the first frill was the Dutch Frill dating back to the 18th century, originating from the old Dutch Fancy Canary. Developments in different parts of the continent then resulted in several distinct breeds. Some of the frilled varieties seen today are newer, developed in more recent years in Italy. The Parisian Frilled Canary was reportedly developed during the 19th century in France. Named "Frisé Parisien", the Parisian Frill - in 1910, it was simply referred to as the "Parisian".

The Parisian Frilled Canary is one of the largest of all canary varieties as well as being well built and robust looking. They reach an overall length of about from 7 3/4 to 8 1/4 inches (19.7 to 21 cm), and can have a wingspan up to about 11 1/2 inches (29 cm).      The primary feature of all frilled canaries are three distinct patterns of curled feathers. These consist of the mantle, the jabot, and the fins. The mantle feathers are on the back, they part down the center and curl symmetrically over the shoulders forming what looks like a cape. The jabot are wavy undulating feathers coming from each side of the breast, curling inward to form a ruffle that meets in the middle. The fins come from the thighs, long well-frilled feathers that rise upward around the wings. The main focus of the frills is on symmetry rather than volume. Though they should be full, they also need to be crisp and defined.     

Show properties particular for the Parisian Frilled Canary are described as feathering, type, and elegance. Feathering can be one of three qualities; soft, which is the most sought after, semi-soft or ordinary, and hard.  Type and elegance have to do with such things as length, form, carriage, stance, position, symmetry, and the general harmony of its presentation.     

Coloration in frilled canaries is of little importance. They may be buff, green, clear, ticked, or variegated and occasionally a few dominant whites. Yellow is rare except in the the case of the Gibber Italicus.

Dutch Frilled Canary



Parisian Frilled Canary





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Valletta Road, Qormi

Tel: 2744 0606

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